Lanham Act

Redskins Eye Supreme Court to Overturn Trademark Disparagement Restriction

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To update my earlier blog [Blog] concerning whether Section 2 (a) of the Lanham Act, 1946, which restricts federal registration of trademarks  found to be scandalous or disparaging, will withstand challenges to its constitutionality, the Redskins football team has raised the ante by its unusual petition to the Supreme Court.

In the petition, the Redskins suggests that the Supreme Court not consider the constitutionality of Section 2 (a) until after the team’s appeal of an adverse District Court ruling is decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.  Continue reading

DISPARAGEMENT ISSUE IS FRONT & CENTER FOR USPTO TRADEMARK REGISTRATIONS

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Push pin on trademark textSection 2 (a) of the Lanham Act, 1946, 15 U.S.C. Sec. 2 (a), which restricts the registration of trademarks found by the USPTO to be scandalous or disparaging, was determined to be unconstitutional on the basis of the First Amendment by  the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in a case (In re Simon Shiao Tam-2014-1203), brought by “The Slants,” an Asian-American rock band.  [Background]

Mr. Simon Shiao Tam, as the owner of the mark, filed in 2011 a registration application for  “The Slants” (Serial No. 85-472044).  The USPTO examiner rejected the application on the basis that the applied for mark was disparaging under Section 2 (a)  because the word had a long history of being used in a derogatory way for people of Asian decent.  The examining attorney believed that people of Asian decent would take offense from the use of the applied for mark.  The rejection was upheld by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB.) Continue reading

WHY ARE THE SAN DIEGO CHARGERS TAKING PRE-EMPTIVE ACTION TO PROTECT THEIR RIGHTS IN FUTURE TRADEMARKS?

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Football Play Strategy Drawn Out On A Chalk BoardThe football world is abuzz with the possible relocation of the San Diego Chargers to Los Angeles. Background for Team Move.  While the outcome of where the Chargers end up is of short term interest, the more interesting question business owners should ask is: Why did the team file “intent to use” applications  Section 1(b), Lanham Act for federal registration of two possible marks with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”)? 1/  The answer is that the Chargers want to block others from hindering their future adoption of the new marks if the relocation happens.

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